Facility tours are a useful interaction that can provide many benefits for the company. Let’s take a look at why you should have facility tours and why they are beneficial!

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What is a Facility Tour?

A facility tour is a tour through a company’s facilities that shows a new hire where the employees work, where the product is made, how the company runs, and much more! As there are many types of industries, a facility tour would be very different in a real estate office versus a company with an assembly line.

What are the Benefits of Giving Facility Tours?

  • Give customers an inside look. Whether the facility is a nursing home or a manufacturing plant, a facility tour gives customers insight on how the facility runs.
  • Gives new employees the lay of the land. Being a new employee can be intimidating! A facility tour helps the employee be confident in the lay of the land.
  • Gives potential clients a sneak peek. When companies are trying to attract vendors or clients, a facility tour can give the vendor the confidence they need to invest in a quality company.

Who Should Be Invited to Facility Tours

New Employees

It is vital that new employees receive a facility tour either before or on their first day. The facility tour is the first in-depth look they will get into the company. It is important they feel comfortable and are able to navigate their way through their new workplace. Have them come to the front door on their first day so they don’t have to find the employee entrance on their own. Whether first or last in the employee orientation, take them through the facility to see their coworkers’ spaces, the breakroom, the bathrooms, supervisors’ offices, supply closet, and any industry-specific spaces, such as the assembly floor, nurses station, or meeting rooms.

Vendors/Clients

Many companies try to attract vendors or clients to sell their products. Vendors and clients want to know the products and company are quality before making commitments. Showing the layout, how the product is made and how the company runs can be a fantastic way to gain new clients.

Customers

Many companies have customers who directly benefit from their services such as nursing homes, stadiums or event centers. They can directly benefit from giving tours of their facilities to attract the business of direct customers. By giving the tour, they can show what their facility is capable of where pictures wouldn’t do justice. In a nursing home tour, the customer can visualize themselves in that facility while seeing the other residents and how the nursing staff works.

How To Conduct a Facility Tour

Step 1: Introduction and Information

All facility tours should start at the front desk or front office areas. As the person/group who is touring doesn’t know the facility yet, that is an easy place to meet to get the group started.  When everyone has arrived, introduce who is giving the tour and their position at the facility. Give a general overview of what the tour will contain. If the facility contains any areas that require PPE (personal protective equipment) or need to follow strict guidelines on where to walk, give that information in advance and hand out needed PPE. Include how long the tour will last and if there are any activities planned during or after the tour.

Step 2: The Tour

From the start of the tour, make sure the path flows. Have some information readily available at each stop with a pause for questions. If time is a factor, make sure the tour includes the areas that make the most impact on the tourees. Use the opportunity to show off the company and what makes it special. Whether the tour is for a new employee or a potential client, make it fun and exciting.

Step 3: The Follow-Up

After the tour, take time for extra questions. Depending on the facility, it might be a good idea to take a tour survey on their satisfaction with the facility and what it may offer them. If appropriate for the industry, this would be the time to do a potential activity. If the tour is for a client/customer, make sure to have updated contact information for a future call. If it is a new employee, make sure they feel comfortable with the facility and know where to report on their first day of work.

Questions You’ve Asked Us About Facility Tours

If the tour is for a new employee, have HR or the employee’s manager give the tour. If a new vendor/customer wants a tour, the employee who will be interacting with them most should give the tour.
Activities can definitely be a part of the tour depending on the industry. If it is a food/beverage company giving the tour, it would be an added bonus to add some taste testing. In such buildings where there could be hazards, it may not be appropriate to have activities.
The length of a facility tour can depend on the type of facility, but the recommended time would be around 30 minutes and less than an hour. If the tour is paid for, such as a stadium tour, it should last from one to two hours.
Samantha Palm
Samantha Palm, MHRM, SHRM-SCP

Samantha is an HR professional with 9+ years of HR experience in multiple fields. She has her masters in Human Resource Management and her SHRM-SCP certification. While she has a wide variety of People experience and skills, her favorite is employee relations and employee experience. She has built an HR department from the ground up and strives to make the company culture a rewarding, enjoyable experience and takes pride in building relationships with employees Samantha is thrilled to become an HR Maverick to share her experience and keep gaining experience in the career she loves, even during her time as a stay at home mom.

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